#Deep State Unmasked▶ #Social Current See





Source Peter Schweizer is the President of Government Accountability Institute and a best-selling author. From 2008 through 2009 he was a consultant to the Office of Presidential Speechwriting in the White House. He has also served as a member of the Ultraterrorism Study Group at the U.S. government’s Sandia National Laboratory and is a former consultant to NBC News.

In the archived video (above), an interview with Schweizer by Fox Business host Lou Dobbs, Schweizer gives credence to the work of by Jennifer Bachner and Benjamin Ginsberg.

Schweizer books have been translated into eleven languages and include several New York Times or Washington Post bestsellers. Peter’s latest book, Clinton Cash-The Untold Story of How Foreign Governments and Businesses made Bill and Hillary Rich became a New York Times best-seller and spurred independent reporting by multiple mainstream media outlets. Peter is the author of the book Extortion: How Politicians Extract Your Money. Both Extortion and his previous book, Throw Them All Out were New York Times best-sellers and were featured on CBS’s 60 Minutes


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CITED BY AMAZON: Each year unelected federal administrators write thousands of regulations possessing the force of law. What do these civil servants know about the American people whom they ostensibly serve? Not much, according to this enlightening and disturbing study. The authors surveyed federal agency officials, congressional and White House staffers, and employees of various policy-making organizations about their attitudes toward and knowledge of the public. They found a significant chasm between what official Washington assumes they know about average Americans and the actual opinions and attitudes of American citizens. Even in such basic areas as life circumstances (e.g., income levels, employment, racial makeup) the surveys revealed surprising inaccuracies. And when it comes to policy issues--on such crucial issues as defense, crime, social security, welfare, public education, and the environment--officials' perceptions of the public's knowledge and positions are often wide of the mark. Compounding this ignorance is a pervasive attitude of smug dismissiveness toward the citizenry and little sense of accountability. As a result, bureaucrats tend to follow their own preferences without much reference to the opinions of the public. The authors conclude with recommendations to narrow the gap between official perceptions of the American public and the actual facts. These include shorter terms, rotation from the Washington beltway to local offices, compulsory training in the responsibilities of public office, and better civic education for ordinary citizens in the realities of government and politics.




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